Sharing Mayo Clinic

Stories from patients, family, friends and Mayo Clinic staff

May 19th, 2015 · 1 Comment

Patient's Cancer Journey Inspires Hope and a New Career Path

By Hoyt Finnamore

Kristin Yukness at a power lifting event. Kristen Yukness knew what her doctor was going to say next. After a finding of bilateral deep vein thrombosis after a routine flight, Kristen had a strong feeling – based on her family history – that her condition had been caused by an underlying form of cancer.  [...]

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Tags: cancer, Deep Vein Thrombosis, Dr Kenneth DeVault, Dr Matthew Robertson III, Dr Todd Miller, Dr William Cliby, Endocervical Cancer, Mayo Clinic Cancer Center

May 11th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Brain Hemorrhage Can’t Keep Cyclist From Pedaling On

By Cynthia (Cindy) Weiss

Donnie continues to recover from a brain hemorrhage that caused a stroke.

At age 42, Donnie DeWitt was the picture of health. A former Marine, he loved to run, surf and was an avid cyclist. But three years ago, while on a bike ride near his home in St. Augustine, Florida, Donnie collapsed. He’d suffered a massive brain hemorrhage that led to a stroke.

He was brought to Mayo Clinic’s Comprehensive Stroke Center in Jacksonville, where physicians said the damage was so extensive that Donnie had less than a five percent chance of survival.

“We didn’t know if he was going to live, what the outcome would be,” says Belinda, Donnie’s wife. [...]

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Tags: brain hemorrhage, Florida Campus, stroke, Comprehensive Stroke Center, Dr Ronald Reimer

May 8th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Tracking Down an Elusive Answer

By Hoyt Finnamore

Scott Borden enjoying time with his family. Plagued by persistent symptoms with no definitive cause, Scott Borden turned to Mayo Clinic to help solve a baffling medical condition that was interfering with his life. 
[...]

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Tags: Adrenal Gland Disorder, Dr William Young Jr, Endocrinology

May 6th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Proton Beam Therapy Gives Young Girl Good Prognosis Despite (Frightening) Diagnosis

By Hoyt Finnamore

AnikaChesakWeb
It's one thing to teach compassionate communication. It's another thing altogether to be on the receiving end of, "Your daughter has cancer." Learn how proton beam therapy gave Sherry Chesak, Ph.D., and her family hope.  [...]

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Tags: Dr Robert Foote, Dr Sameer Keole, Dr Steven Schild, Jacobson Building, Proton Therapy, Rhabdomyosarcoma, Rochester Campus, Soft Tissue Cancer

May 4th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Young Stroke Survivor Raises Awareness and Educates

By Cynthia (Cindy) Weiss

Young stroke survivor Amy Edmunds and Dr. David Miller, director of the Comprehensive Stroke Center at Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Florida

Young stroke survivor Amy Edmunds and David Miller, M.D., director of the Comprehensive Stroke Center at Mayo Clinic's Florida campus.

Editor's Note: This guest post is written by Amy Edmunds, founder of YoungStroke.

In 2002, I was a daily commuter to Capitol Hill who worked in sales management. Never did I think I would someday return to testify as a patient advocate at Congressional hearings on behalf of young stroke survivors. But then again, never did I expect to be a stroke survivor at age 45.

On Jan. 11, 2002, with no identified risk factors and no family history, I had an ischemic stroke. Initially, my mother observed my repeating phrases during conversation. Next, she witnessed my temporary blindness. Today, I have no recollection of these events. And my resulting deficit remains some long-term memory loss.

Like many, I mistakenly assumed stroke was an affliction of the elderly. As I attempted to learn more about my own experience, I learned approximately 30 percent of people who suffer a stroke each year are under age 65. And women are at an increased risk for stroke. So, too, are African American individuals – many of whom have significant aftereffects.  [...]

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Tags: stroke, Dr David Miller, Comprehensive Stroke Center, Florida Campus

April 27th, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Celebrating Nurse Anesthetist Education -- Florence Henderson, Specialist in Ether Anesthesia

By Hoyt Finnamore

Florence Hederson in the operating room with Dr. Charles H. Mayo. Written by Joan Hunziker Dean

To recognize the 125th anniversary of nurse anesthetist education and the role of nurse anesthetist at Mayo Clinic, Sharing Mayo Clinic will include a series of vignettes highlighting influential Mayo Clinic nurse anesthetists. Those featured received their education at Mayo Clinic and went on to be instrumental in providing anesthesia education and make significant contributions to anesthesia practice.

Florence Henderson (1874-1956) served as nurse anesthetist for Charles H. Mayo, M.D. She graduated from Bishop Clarkson Hospital Training School for Nurses, Omaha, Nebraska, in 1900. As superintendent of nurses at Bishop Clarkson, she learned and taught to administer ether and chloroform anesthetics. Hired by the Mayo brothers in 1904, Henderson moved to Rochester, Minnesota, and worked with Alice Magaw, known as the “Mother of Anesthesia.” Under Magaw’s expert mentorship, Henderson became an ether specialist.

At the Nurse Alumnae Convention in 1909, Henderson spoke about the importance of nurse specialists in delivering anesthetics and also debated the use of ether versus nitrous oxide anesthesia with Agatha Hodgins, future founder of the National Association of Nurse Anesthetists (a forerunner of the current American Association of Nurse Anesthetists), who was a nitrous oxide specialist.  [...]

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Tags: education, Florence Henderson, history, Nurse Anesthetists

April 23rd, 2015 · Leave a Comment

A Long Journey to a Seizure-Free Life

By Hoyt Finnamore

Kate Seifert send her neurologist a photo from Kilimanjaro to show him that she'd gotten her life back.In December 2014, Gregory Cascino, M.D., a neurologist at Mayo Clinic, received a photo of a former patient. Kate Seifert was standing at the top of Mount Kilimanjaro in Tanzania, almost 20,000 feet above sea level, at the mountain’s Uhuru Peak. The photo was accompanied by a note from Seifert’s mother.

“We will be forever grateful for the miracle you and everyone at Mayo Clinic gave to Kate and our family,” wrote Karen Seifert.

The story of that miracle begins 20 years earlier, when Kate, then a high school student in Appleton, Wisconsin, began having seizures. “I had my first complex seizure in the middle of a basketball game,” she says. “I was on my way back to the bench and fell on the ground shaking.” After a visit to the emergency department and an appointment with her primary care physician, Kate was referred to a neurologist. She was diagnosed with epilepsy.

Initially, the diagnosis had seemed to come without warning. But as Kate learned more about the condition, she realized she had been having partial seizures for several months.

“I’d have episodes where I’d feel like someone else was controlling my thoughts, or times where the corners or a wall would look huge, but the rest of the wall would look normal,” Kate says. “My mom had wanted to take me to a psychiatrist.” As the family’s epilepsy education began, they realized these episodes were sensory seizures. Soon, Kate would be having those seizures daily.  [...]

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Tags: Dr. Gregory Cascino, Dr. Richard Marsh, Epilepsy, Neurology & Neurosurgery, seizures

April 21st, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Living Kidney Donations Save Two Lives in the Same Family Years Apart

By Paul Scotti

TammyStelly805Receiving a donor kidney from an anonymous deceased donor is a gift of life to anyone in need of a transplant.  Receiving an organ donation from a living family member is extra special, when you consider the risks and sacrifices associated with making that choice.

Tammy Stelly, a 46-year-old retired postal worker from Middleburg, Florida, experienced that special gift when her brother-in-law was found to be a compatible match and became her living kidney donor.

“I was overwhelmed that he offered to be tested as a possible match,” says Tammy. “I never imagined that we might actually be a compatible match.”

Tammy isn’t the first member of her family to have kidney disease, nor was she the first to receive a kidney transplant from a living donor who also is a family member. One of her relatives received a kidney from his daughter many years ago, and lived another 17 years before passing away due to unrelated causes.  [...]

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Tags: Florida Campus, kidney transplant, Mayo Clinic Transplant Center

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