Sharing Mayo Clinic

Stories from patients, family, friends and Mayo Clinic staff

Sharing Mayo Clinic feed

Margaret Shepard (@margieshepard) posted · Mon, Aug 18 2:50pm · View  

Ella Schultz: Thriving with Family and Medical Support

Ella Schultz holding catEven before 6-year-old Ella Schultz was born, she was already a miracle and had beaten many odds. Because Ella's mother, Patty, was 42 years-old when she was considering becoming a parent, and her father, Ernie, had survived cancer, neither were sure they would be able to conceive a child. Fortunately, they were able to become pregnant quickly. Patty's pregnancy was trouble-free, and when Ella was born, on Christmas Day in 2001, she appeared perfectly healthy.

"At two months of age, however, Ella began to develop tan 'cafe-au-lait' spots on her skin, which are pigmented birthmarks," says Patty. "Because these spots can sometimes signal bigger health issues, our local doctor referred us to Mayo Clinic for testing." [...]

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Nf1Shauna (@crayolaqt) responded:

I don't know if it is possible, but I would love to get in touch with the Schultz family. I was Ella's teacher when she was in Preschool at Richfield United Methodist Church. I also have NF1. It has been years since I have seen Elle or her parents due to their movie. So if it is possible to get in touch with them, I would love to!

Posted 3 day(s) ago · View
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Hoyt Finnamore (@hoytfinnamore) posted · Sat, Aug 16 7:56am · View  

In a moment … a poem, and a vision of hope

Photo of hands playing piano. Sometimes the only way to respond to a thing of beauty is to pour your thoughts out onto the page. And that’s what Mayo Clinic patient Jerry O’Donnell, of Waterloo, Iowa, did after being moved, perhaps even changed, by experiencing the beauty of music in the atrium of the Gonda Building on Mayo’s Rochester campus.

Over the past year, Jerry has been a regular visitor to Mayo Clinic, after being diagnosed with a rare form of abdominal cancer located in the duodenum. It was a difficult diagnosis. “Over a short period of time, the reality of my health became more weight bearing,” he says. “Even while at Mayo, peaceful moments were difficult.”

When something like that happens, he says, your values change and things take on a new significance. Jerry found healing moments while listening to the piano in the atrium in the Gonda Building. “The piano became a refuge,” he says. “Music brought hope and connection. A larger family emerged before me as did a humbler sense of self with more gratitude for just being alive today surrounded by the treasures of my life, my family. Music like ‘It’s A Wonderful World,’ ‘Amazing Grace,’ and even ‘The Wheels on the Bus’ can change us.” [...]

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Paula Shaner (@paulashaner3) responded:

Jerry, That piano holds magical powers. My son loved/loves sitting there and "making" music. It's always been a highlight through his bone marrow transplant journey. He started at 14 mo old and is hitting the big notes at 5 yo. Love the magic music holds at Gonda.

Posted Wed, Aug 13 at 9:46pm CDT · View

bets (@bethcr) responded:

Jerry, I LOVE this poem! It says it all! But what really struck me was the line that says "walking along to find that appointment of hope" I remember that feeling so well! And "a cross section of our world walking together" How true that is. If everyone could experience the peace at the Mayo, maybe our worlds/country wouldn't be so divided. I've learned so much on my journey to find answers,but what I hold [...]

Posted 5 day(s) ago · View
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iggeez (@iggeez1416) posted · Fri, Aug 15 3:07pm · View  

Mystery Solved – Diagnosis Moves Patient from Frustration to Peace of Mind and a Plan

Karen Gibson at Mayo Clinic with her husband. I want to share my story to possibly help another person and to hopefully help others who are still facing their own health unknowns.

I struggled for years with extreme fatigue, major skin problems, muscle weakness, escalating eye issues, and a host of other unexplained symptoms. I moved to Georgia with more and more symptoms. I developed relationships with new doctors and developed new symptoms – seizures and heart-related syncope. I went to see a neurologist, who began to run tests. In the meantime, I had regular quarterly blood panels by my regular physician, who upon reporting to me by phone noted no irregularities. I was told time and time again to stop chasing a diagnosis. My family continued to watch my decline.

After running numerous tests, my neurologist could only ascertain that I may have had some mini-strokes. My neurologist referred me to a major university hospital. After two visits, and being practically laughed out of the place, I began to have serious doubts about my symptoms and began to believe the many specialists and psychologists who told me it was emotional response.  [...]

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Hoyt Finnamore (@hoytfinnamore) posted · Thu, Aug 14 4:36pm · View  

A Kidney Between Friends

Todd Goldrick, transplant patient, stops for a photo with his donor, Marty Yeager. Todd Goldrick was living the dream. Good job. Loving wife. Two young, healthy kids. Weekends spent playing golf, softball, kayaking, hiking, running or just hanging around home with the family. But that changed suddenly in 2010, when he and his wife simply tried to buy some life insurance. He was just 28.

"Mine came back straight out denied," Todd says. "They told me the reasons. There was a whole long list -- high cholesterol, high blood pressure, and a few other things that I don't remember exactly."

Before that day, Todd says he'd been to see his doctor in the Minneapolis–Saint Paul area "maybe every two years," so the policy denial came of left field. In fact, he says it scared him into doing nothing about it, at least initially. "I was kind of naïve and a little scared to go back to the doctor," he says. "So I didn't do anything."

Six months later, he got a sinus infection that wouldn't go away, and eventually he went to urgent care, where some flags were raised unrelated to his sinuses. "They took my blood pressure, and it was 200 over 120," he says. "At that point, they told me I needed to go to the ER."  [...]

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