Sharing Mayo Clinic

Stories from patients, family, friends and Mayo Clinic staff

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Richard J (@rkoziol) posted · Recent activity · Mon, Sep 22 2:30pm · View  

My VA doctor at Tripler Medical Center said I had a Cardiac amyloidosis disease.I would like to get a second opinion

Hoyt Finnamore (@hoytfinnamore) responded:

Hi, Richard. If you would like to seek help from Mayo Clinic, please call one of our appointment offices (Arizona: 480-301-1735 Florida: 904-953-0853 Minnesota: 507-284-2511). Unfortunately, we cannot diagnose conditions, provide second opinions or make specific treatment recommendations through this website. Below are a couple links you might find helpful. http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/amyloidosis/basics/definition/con-20024354 http://www.mayoclinic.org/medical-professionals/clinical-updates/cardiovascular/role-of-cardiac-mri-in-the-assessment-of-cardiac-amyloidosis

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Makala Johnson (@makalajohnson) posted · Mon, Sep 15 2:28am · View  

Unraveling the Mystery of Semicircular Canal Dehiscence Syndrome

Imagine listening in real time to the thump, thump of your own heartbeat, the rush of your blood pulsing through your veins, and even the slightest twitch of your eyes - all in surround sound.  Those are but a few of the symptoms that Wendy Tapper was experiencing when she arrived at the Mayo Clinic in May of 2012.

The Journey to Mayo

Wendy TapperOutgoing and energetic Wendy, of Kansas City, Mo., enjoyed a career as a producer and publicist.  Bringing people and ideas together was second nature to Wendy and aided in her determination to find the answers in her own health care.

For three years prior to coming to Mayo Clinic in spring 2012, Wendy went from doctor to doctor and endured batteries of tests, scans, appointments and misdiagnoses.  Her rare condition ultimately revealed by Mayo physicians was masked in part by two distinct illnesses - breast cancer and a stroke. 

While those illnesses and the treatments Wendy was receiving are life-altering, they were compounded with the escalation of an underlying third and separate issue.  It was the escalation of her symptoms of dizziness, hearing loss and a drastically diminishing quality of life that brought Wendy to Mayo Clinic. [...]

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stuart (@stulacey) responded:

My wife has been suffering from scsd for about 5 years. Unfortunately it seems to be getting worse. With being a mother to four kids its getting close to being unmanageable. I was very excited to read about Wendy's story and her recovery from scsd. I was amazed there is a way of fixing the problem without major surgery. We live in Australia and love to hear if this treatment is being performed in this [...]

Posted Wed, Aug 6 at 8:41am CDT · View

Leaj (@leaj) responded:

I have just been diagnosed last Monday after a 12 year battle to find out what was wrong with me , I also live in Australia. I have it in both ears and have had balance issues my entire life , but the symptoms became debilitating about 12 years ago when I bought a property high on a mountain. It is only 889 meters above sea level, but I traveled daily to work and became [...]

Posted Mon, Sep 15 at 2:28am CDT · View
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Margaret Shepard (@margieshepard) posted · Sun, Sep 14 7:33am · View  

No more sweaty palms

Barbara Moy"It's great to meet you," says Barbara Moy, smiling and offering her hand. The commonplace act of shaking hands is for Barbara akin to a miracle.

Since she was a child, Barbara has lived with a rare condition called hyperhidrosis. For persons with hyperhidrosis, "the sweat just pours off," explains Dawn Jaroszewski, M.D., a specialist at Mayo Clinic in Arizona and an expert in treating the condition.

Hyperhidrosis can affect almost any part of the body. In Barbara's case, the sweating occurred primarily on her palms, making everyday tasks and social actions like shaking hands nearly impossible to perform.

Because the condition isn't life-threatening, hyperhidrosis is often not taken seriously by others. Yet the effects of the disease can be socially devastating. [...]

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laurelhardy (@laurelhardy) responded:

How about using Electro Antiperspirant?

Posted Sun, Sep 14 at 7:33am CDT · View
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Paul Scotti (@pscotti) posted · Thu, Sep 11 7:58am · View  

Mayo Clinic Clinical Trial Helps Physician Take On Multiple Myeloma

Dr. Mike Mass undergoes treatment for multiple myeloma at Mayo Clinic in Florida.

When 69-year-old allergist and rheumatologist Mike Mass. M.D., was diagnosed with multiple myeloma in August 2013, he quickly realized that being the patient and trusting the advice of a fellow physician with expertise in a disease outside of his realm of expertise would be a challenge.

“I’ve always advocated open communications with my patients about their treatment options, as it’s important for the physician and patient to be on the same page,” says Dr. Mass. “Although I’m not a cancer expert, I know enough about the disease to ask lots of questions of my own oncologist on the best treatment options available. It was hard balancing the need to express my opinions without impeding my physician’s own expert medical judgment.”

Dr. Mass was in private practice in the Jacksonville, Florida, area for more than 30 years before going part-time and joining an allergy group practice in 2008. That’s where he worked until his diagnosis in 2013, when he finally decided to retire from practicing medicine. He had known he was at a greater risk for contracting multiple myeloma for many years because of a condition called monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance , or MGUS, which he was diagnosed with decades ago. MGUS is a condition in which an abnormal protein (M protein) is found in the blood. That increases the risk of developing multiple myeloma at some point in the patient’s life. Dr. Mass had no symptoms but found out several years ago after some blood work that his M protein levels were at the point where he now had “smoldering myeloma,” an early phase of this cancer condition. [...]

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