Sharing Mayo Clinic

Stories from patients, family, friends and Mayo Clinic staff

Education

July 1st, 2016

Remembrance Events at Mayo Clinic Give Family Time to Reflect and Share

By SharingMayoClinic SharingMayoClinic

Carol Mannell remembers her sister, Kathy VanHulle, as a woman who always loved meeting new people and having fun. Carol Mannell remembers her younger sister, Kathy VanHulle, as a woman who loved meeting new people and having fun. Carol recalls how, despite being in the midst of receiving care for a serious illness when she was at Mayo Clinic, Kathy would take time to strike up conversations with people sitting next to her in waiting rooms. She would ask them to write messages in a journal she carried with her. Kathy and Carol would sing together in her hospital room.

Kathy even convinced members of her care team at Mayo Clinic to get up and dance.

“We had a lot of fun. Everywhere Kathy went at Mayo, we’d talk, laugh and get people to do the happy dance with her,” Carol says. “She had a big personality.”

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Tags: Dr Mark Litzow, Hematology Oncology, Mayo Medical School, Mayo School of Health Sciences


June 17th, 2016

Difficult Diagnosis Interrupts Residency, Gives Young Doctor a New View of Patient Care

By SharingMayoClinic SharingMayoClinic

Natalie Ertz-Archambault, M.D. plans to apply for fellowships in hematology and medical oncology after uncovering the cause of her illness.Successfully finishing a medical residency is a significant milestone in any physician's career. But when Natalie Ertz-Archambault, M.D., graduated in June 2016 from the Internal Medicine Residency at Mayo Clinic's Arizona campus, the achievement felt particularly sweet.

"It was an incredible success for me, since I actually started my residency in 2012, completed four months, and then became too ill to work," she says. "At that time, I wasn't sure if I'd ever reach graduation."

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Tags: Arizona campus, Dr Fadi Shamoun, Dr Leslie Thomas, Dr Natalie Ertz-Archambault, Dr Richard Fowl, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, Internal Medicine Residency


March 4th, 2016

Eight Lessons on “Compassion in Health Care” From the Dalai Lama

By SharingMayoClinic SharingMayoClinic

His Holiness the Dalai Lama gives a talk on "Compassion in Health Care" to Mayo Clinic staff. "A more compassionate mind is very, very helpful to good health."

"Loving kindness, warm-heartedness are keys to health."

"Each of us has some responsibility to make a contribution."

"You can lead this moment because you practice these things."

These words from His Holiness the Dalai Lama resonated with Mayo Clinic staff and guests gathered to hear a special talk on "Compassion in Health Care" on Monday, Feb. 29, at the chapel on the Saint Marys Campus of Mayo Clinic Hospital in Rochester. The Dalai Lama's message was especially pertinent in a setting with a strong connection to the Mayo Clinic Value Statements, which include the values of compassion, respect and healing, all of which came up repeatedly in the Dalai Lama's talk and question-and-answer session that followed.  Read the rest of this entry »

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Tags: Compassion, Dalai Lama, healing, Mayo Clinic Values, meditation


May 4th, 2015

Young Stroke Survivor Raises Awareness and Educates

By Cynthia (Cindy) Weiss cindyweiss

Young stroke survivor Amy Edmunds and Dr. David Miller, director of the Comprehensive Stroke Center at Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Florida

Young stroke survivor Amy Edmunds and David Miller, M.D., director of the Comprehensive Stroke Center at Mayo Clinic's Florida campus.

Editor's Note: This guest post is written by Amy Edmunds, founder of YoungStroke.

In 2002, I was a daily commuter to Capitol Hill who worked in sales management. Never did I think I would someday return to testify as a patient advocate at Congressional hearings on behalf of young stroke survivors. But then again, never did I expect to be a stroke survivor at age 45.

On Jan. 11, 2002, with no identified risk factors and no family history, I had an ischemic stroke. Initially, my mother observed my repeating phrases during conversation. Next, she witnessed my temporary blindness. Today, I have no recollection of these events. And my resulting deficit remains some long-term memory loss.

Like many, I mistakenly assumed stroke was an affliction of the elderly. As I attempted to learn more about my own experience, I learned approximately 30 percent of people who suffer a stroke each year are under age 65. And women are at an increased risk for stroke. So, too, are African American individuals – many of whom have significant aftereffects.  Read the rest of this entry »

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Tags: stroke, Dr David Miller, Comprehensive Stroke Center, Florida Campus


April 27th, 2015

Celebrating Nurse Anesthetist Education — Florence Henderson, Specialist in Ether Anesthesia

By Hoyt Finnamore HoytFinnamore

Florence Hederson in the operating room with Dr. Charles H. Mayo. Written by Joan Hunziker Dean

To recognize the 125th anniversary of nurse anesthetist education and the role of nurse anesthetist at Mayo Clinic, Sharing Mayo Clinic will include a series of vignettes highlighting influential Mayo Clinic nurse anesthetists. Those featured received their education at Mayo Clinic and went on to be instrumental in providing anesthesia education and make significant contributions to anesthesia practice.

Florence Henderson (1874-1956) served as nurse anesthetist for Charles H. Mayo, M.D. She graduated from Bishop Clarkson Hospital Training School for Nurses, Omaha, Nebraska, in 1900. As superintendent of nurses at Bishop Clarkson, she learned and taught to administer ether and chloroform anesthetics. Hired by the Mayo brothers in 1904, Henderson moved to Rochester, Minnesota, and worked with Alice Magaw, known as the “Mother of Anesthesia.” Under Magaw’s expert mentorship, Henderson became an ether specialist.

At the Nurse Alumnae Convention in 1909, Henderson spoke about the importance of nurse specialists in delivering anesthetics and also debated the use of ether versus nitrous oxide anesthesia with Agatha Hodgins, future founder of the National Association of Nurse Anesthetists (a forerunner of the current American Association of Nurse Anesthetists), who was a nitrous oxide specialist.  Read the rest of this entry »

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Tags: Education, Florence Henderson, History, Nurse Anesthetists


December 1st, 2014

Celebrating Nurse Anesthetist Education – Edith Graham Mayo

By Hoyt Finnamore HoytFinnamore

Art depicts Edith Graham Mayo providing anesthesia support for the Mayo brothers. To recognize the 125th anniversary of nurse anesthetist education and the role of nurse anesthetist at Mayo Clinic, Sharing Mayo Clinic will include a special series of posts throughout the coming year. These vignettes will describe how nurse anesthesia education has changed over time and will highlight influential Mayo Clinic nurse anesthetists. Those featured received their education at Mayo Clinic and went on to be instrumental in providing anesthesia education and make significant contributions to anesthesia practice.


Written by Darlene Bannon and Evadne Edwards 

In every pioneering achievement, there are visionaries, those who theorize and dream beyond the safe haven of the present. However, the visionary’s dreams would not be realized if not for the activist: one whose thoughts become action, who is flexible and accommodating, and who possess the drive to achieve and influence.

Edith Graham Mayo, Mayo’s first nurse anesthetist, was both a visionary and an activist.

​Edith has primarily been remembered as the wife of Dr. Charles Mayo, one of Mayo Clinic’s founders. Historically, her professional life as an anesthetist has received little mention. Edith Graham was Saint Marys Hospital’s first trained nurse, anesthetist and nurse educator. She was an integral part of the visionary team that founded what we know today as Mayo Clinic. Read the rest of this entry »

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Tags: Edith Graham Mayo, Education, History, Nurse Anesthetists


March 1st, 2013

Prenatal Education Class: A special relationship between 3 moms and daughters

By Makala Arce (Johnson) MakalaJohnson

In the Winter of 2011, my husband Cameron and I (Megan Rask) were expecting our first child. We were beyond thrilled! I had been doing my care with the midwives at Mayo Clinic, Rochester. Of course, I wanted to sign my husband and I up for every baby class offered!

We soon began the six week prenatal education class, instructed by Christine Baker, R.N. Along with this class, I made sure to sign us up for the infant passenger safety class, and a tour of the labor and delivery floor in Eisenberg.  We also took our newly purchased SUV to the local fire station to have our infant seat inspected by Todd Emanuel, R.N. As parents to be, this was high on our list of things to do: make sure our baby would be safe in our new family car!

Girls at 15 MonthsIn prenatal class, we met two other couples: Bethany Renstrom and her husband (expecting a baby girl) and Stephanie Fisk and her husband (also expecting a little girl). My husband and I were patiently waiting until the day of delivery to find out the sex of our baby. In class, Chris went over everything we needed to know to prepare for the birth of our baby: bathing a newborn, practicing breathing through contractions, and where to park and what doors to come in once we were in labor. She even showed us the gown and pads we’d wear in the hospital, and the Forceps they might use, in the event our baby was in a difficult situation. Seeing all these things in class made it easier for me to mentally prepare for labor. Read the rest of this entry »

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Tags: babies, Baby, Education, Family Birth Center, mom, perinatal, pregnancy, prenatal


November 20th, 2012

Career Influenced by The Mayo Clinic and an Alligator

By Makala Arce (Johnson) MakalaJohnson

Dr. McCullyMy wife, Marion, and I are both third generation natives of Florida. And so, heading up to Minnesota in our old Volkswagen bug for my three year residency at Mayo Clinic seemed like an adventure to the north pole. We soon learned to love Rochester and the good people there, and we have always had fond memories of our time in Minnesota. The mother of one of my classmates lived on the coast of southern Georgia, and she wanted him to move there and practice at the local hospital. During his visit to see if this was a good place to begin his career, he came upon a large alligator near his mother's house. As he was from Minnesota, he returned to Rochester and declared that: "There is no way I am taking my children to live in a place with huge reptiles in the yard." As a Floridian, this didn't bother me in the least—I joined the hospital staff there and practiced in Georgia and Florida for the next thirty years. Since I have retired I have written a memoir, Good Times in the Hospital. Although this is mostly a collection of humorous anecdotes, it also reflects the importance of compassionate care that was impressed upon me during my years at The Mayo Clinic.

Written by J. G. McCully MD

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Tags: Good Times in the Hospital, J. G. McCully MD, residency


July 16th, 2012

From resident to fellow…in social media.

By Makala Arce (Johnson) MakalaJohnson

Social media can be a scary, intimidating thing. The Mayo Clinic Center for Social Media offers hands-on, rigorous training sessions to those who would like to apply social media to their work and make it a little less scary. Anyone can attend, including Mayo Clinic employees and volunteers, but also external professionals.

I attended the Social Media Residency as part of my Public Affairs internship at Mayo Clinic. In this role, I am involved in a variety of areas, but mostly internal communications. I create communication pieces about topics including employee achievements, patient stories, research, and keeping employees informed and aware of things happening at Mayo Clinic. In several of these roles, internal social media is considered, allowing me to create communication plans centered around these tools. I chose to attend the residency not only to hone my skills for my current job, but to make myself a more marketable candidate for future employment; social media matters, and more and more employers are looking for professionals well-versed in it.

I participated in the Social Media Residency at the Rochester campus on June 25 and 26. The two-day residency guided us through the use of many social media tools including Twitter, LinkedIn, Facebook, Yammer, Pinterest, WordPress and YouTube. A social media expert presented each tool in depth, and we were then asked to discuss how we could apply each tool to our work areas. Read the rest of this entry »

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Tags: Center for Social Media, intern, Katie Streater, residency, Social Media


May 8th, 2012

Just Keep Trying: Kids and Positive Airway Pressure Therapy

By Makala Arce (Johnson) MakalaJohnson

The Patient Education video titled Just Keep Trying: Kids and Positive Airway Pressure Therapy (PAP) helps kids understand how important it is to use PAP.  Several kids share their experience about getting used to the therapy machine and that it helps them sleep better and gives them more energy.  Parents also talk about diagnosis and testing, treatment results, what usually happens with the PAP, the child's responsibility and use while away from home.

Check out a clip from this award-winning educational video:

If you think this video may help your child, ask your Mayo Clinic health care provider for a copy.  Patient education materials produced by Mayo Clinic are available without cost to Mayo Clinic patients.

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Tags: airway, breathing, energy, kids, mayo, PAP, sleep, therapy


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