Sharing Mayo Clinic

Stories from patients, family, friends and Mayo Clinic staff

Uncategorized

April 6th, 2017

Disc Replacement Keeps Darrell Deutz Behind the Lens

By SharingMayoClinic SharingMayoClinic

With severe neck pain limiting his career as a photographer, Darrell Deutz knew he needed a long-term solution. He found it at Mayo Clinic, where minimally invasive spine surgery fixed the problem and allowed him to get back to business.

As a talented wedding photographer, the pain of cervical stenosis with a herniated disc left Darrell Deutz, age 59, searching for solutions.

"I've photographed over a thousand weddings in my life," says Darrell, who owns his own studio based in Fargo, North Dakota. "A lot of photographers don't like the pressure. There is no second chance, so you have to be confident. You can't make any mistakes. I like the challenge."

Read the rest of this entry »

View full entry · Comment on this

Tags: Dr Mohamad Bydon, Dr Rodolfo Savica, Neurology and Neurosurgery


April 5th, 2017

3D Printing Paves the Way for Precision Surgeries

By SharingMayoClinic SharingMayoClinic

Using advanced 3D models to prepare for complex surgeries helps Mayo Clinic surgeons precisely tailor treatment to individual patients and their unique needs.

The surgical teams assembled to operate on Mayo Clinic's most complex patients lately have begun to consist of more than living, breathing members. The new recruits are usually small enough to hold in your hand, and they don't say a word. But the information conveyed by these 3D anatomical printed models is helping surgeons plan and navigate the trickiest of procedures.

In late 2016, Mayo Clinic thoracic surgeon Mark Allen, M.D. was part of a surgical team that used a 3D printed model to help them prepare to remove a rare, intrusive pancoast tumor. The tumor had grown in the chest of a patient, between his ribs and among the vessels just above his lungs.

Read the rest of this entry »

View full entry · Comment on this

Tags: 3D printing, Dr Jane Matsumoto, Dr Basel Sharaf, Dr Jonathan Morris, Dr Mark Allen, Dr Uldis Bite, Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Radiology


January 23rd, 2017

Aboard Floating Hospital, Bringing Medical Help to Poorest Nations

By SharingMayoClinic SharingMayoClinic

As part of the volunteer medical crew on a hospital ship, Mayo Clinic nurse anesthetist Brittany Blake put her expertise to work providing much-needed care to patients in West Africa.
Brittany Blake, a nurse anesthetist at Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus, has participated in many international missions trips over the past five years. But her recent experience as a volunteer with Mercy Ships, an international faith-based organization that sends floating hospitals to some of the poorest nations is the world, was different than any of her other missions. This time, she could put her medical training to work.

Read the rest of this entry »

View full entry · Comment on this

Tags: Brittany Blake, volunteer


December 15th, 2016

Cowboy Back in Saddle After Successful Treatment of Glomerulonephritis

By SharingMayoClinic SharingMayoClinic

Diagnosis and treatment of glomerulonephritis, a serious kidney disease, has allowed Jack Rhodes to put his focus back on the activities he enjoys.

During the summer of 2016, for the first time in years, Jack Rhodes did something he doubted he’d ever do again. The 68-year-old retired rancher from central Alabama saddled up a two-year old stallion to train, exercise and ride.

Four years ago, Jack had gained 40 pounds due to fluid retention that resulted in swelling throughout his body. He suffered severe shortness of breath and was unable to walk, much less get on a horse. But thanks to an accurate diagnosis of his condition and successful treatment at Mayo Clinic’s Florida campus under the care of nephrologist Nabeel Aslam, M.D., Jack’s condition has improved dramatically.

Read the rest of this entry »

View full entry · Comment on this

Tags: Chronic kidney disease, Dr Nabeel Aslam, Glomerulonephritis, kidney failure, Mayo Nephrology Collaborative Group


November 23rd, 2016

Body Builder Regains Energy After Surgery for Myasthenia Gravis

By SharingMayoClinic SharingMayoClinic

Robert Clark with his busy family. Six years ago, Robert Clark thought he was having a stroke. His left eye drooped shut, and he began to have difficulty swallowing. A competitive body builder used to working out six times a week, Robert rarely got sick. So when a local physician dismissed his symptoms, he sought out a friend who worked at Mayo Clinic.

His friend recommended he see Paul Brazis, M.D., a physician who specializes in neuro-ophthalmology. After examining Robert, Dr. Brazis suspected myasthenia gravis, a rare autoimmune disorder characterized by weakness and fatigue of the skeletal muscles as a result of an enlarged thymus. The thymus, an H-shaped gland situated in the upper chest that produces T-cells to fight disease, is supposed to shrink after birth, when bone marrow takes over this function.

Following a series of tests, the diagnosis of myasthenia gravis was confirmed. Robert then faced difficult decisions about managing his disease while living life as he wanted.   Read the rest of this entry »

View full entry · Comment on this

Tags: Dr Matthew Thomas, Dr Paul Brazis, Florida Campus, minimally invasive surgery, myasthenia gravis, Robotic Thymectomy


May 10th, 2016

Love and Determination Help Brennan Get Back on His Feet in Time to Walk Down the Aisle

By SharingMayoClinic SharingMayoClinic

BrennanFarley805Before October 2015, Brennan Farley had never broken a bone in his body. That changed dramatically when a horrific vehicle accident landed the 30-year-old farm worker in Mayo Clinic Hospital, Saint Marys Campus, for two months.

Due to Brennan's extensive injuries, doctors were concerned he might not be able to walk again. But with the help of a supportive care team and the love and encouragement of his fiancée, Kayla, Brennan progressed enough in his recovery to go home in December 2015. And to walk down the aisle at the end of his wedding ceremony a month later, with a little help and with his new bride by his side.

"The people at Saint Marys really cared about me," Brennan says. "They want their work to be great, and it shows. It really shows." And he would certainly need their best efforts.  Read the rest of this entry »

View full entry · Comment on this

Tags: Critical Care, Emergency Department, General Surgery, Rehabilitation, trauma


October 19th, 2015

Sidelined No More – Scrambler Therapy Puts Tess Wilson Back in Action

By Hoyt Finnamore HoytFinnamore

Tess Wilson is enjoying life again after scrambler therapy helped her chronic pain. Each year after their big Thanksgiving meal, Tess Wilson's family has a tradition of playing games in a gym to burn off some calories. For much of her high school and college years, Tess spent that afternoon sitting on the sidelines watching the rest of her family run around. Severe, chronic pain made it impossible for her to join in the fun.

Thanksgiving Day 2014 was different. On that day, Tess was in the thick of the action. She played capture-the-flag, hide-and-go-seek, soccer and tag.

"I was incredibly sore the next day, but not in a chronic pain way," she says. "I just used muscles that I had forgotten were there."

The change came as a result of Tess' participation in a a clinical research trial at Mayo Clinic that studied the effects of a new treatment for chronic nerve pain, called scrambler therapy. After two weeks of the therapy, Tess found relief from the constant pain that had been plaguing her for five years.  Read the rest of this entry »

View full entry · Comment on this

Tags: Chronic Pain, clinical trials, Complex Regional Pain Syndrome, Scrambler Therapy


December 19th, 2014

Operating Room (OR) 10 and Dr. Charles William Mayo

By Hoyt Finnamore HoytFinnamore

 Read time: 5 minutes
Elaine Stewart poses in front of a painting of Dr. Charles W. Mayo.

Elaine Stewart poses in front of a painting of Dr. Charles W. Mayo.

Written by Elaine Stewart, Mayo Clinic Health System Home Health and Hospice

During a recent visit to Mayo Clinic in Rochester, I was reminded of some great memories from my days of working at Saint Marys Hospital over 50 years ago. I want to share some of those memories.

My first visits to Mayo Clinic and Saint Marys Hospital began in 1957. A family member was diagnosed and treated at Mayo Clinic for lymphoma, and I made several trips with him during his illness. He eventually passed away at the hospital in 1959. I enjoyed the visits to Rochester, so a couple of months after my family member’s death, I decided to seek employment at Mayo Clinic. My first stop was Saint Marys Hospital, where I was granted an interview with Sister Merici, the supervisor of Surgery. When I walked out of her office that day, I had a position as a surgical technician! No background check and no waiting period. Sister Merici didn’t tell me at the time, but later told me she hired me because my modesty and wholesome innocence appealed to her.

I was trained on the job by the nurse in charge of Operating Room (OR) 10. I was excited and a little scared, too, because my new job seemed like a huge challenge. And, I had no idea who I would be meeting, and working with for the months and years to come. When I found out one of these people would be Dr. Charles W. Mayo, well, you can only imagine how I felt! I only had started my new job as a surgery technician when he was scheduled to do surgery. I was worried about meeting him, but he made it very easy for me. I was mopping the floor when he walked in and jumped on my mop and greeted me with a warm smile and welcome. From that time on, I was totally comfortable with him. He never held himself above anyone — that’s the kind of person he was.

“Dr. Chuck” is what everyone called him, but I always just called him “Doctor.” As time passed, I did get to know him well. Read the rest of this entry »

View full entry · Comment on this

Tags: Dr Charles W Mayo, Employee Story, Mayo Clinic history


June 30th, 2014

Nicole’s Journey From Nurse to Transplant Patient and Back

By Hoyt Finnamore HoytFinnamore

Mayo Clinic nurse and transplant patient Nicole Jahns. When Nicole Jahns was just five months old, her parents – and her doctors – knew something was wrong. She wasn't gaining weight like a five-month-old should, and she wasn't, as her doctors put it, "thriving." They soon discovered why. Nicole had cystic fibrosis, an inherited disorder that affects the cells that produce mucus, sweat and digestive juices causing them to become thick and sticky rather than thin and slippery, as they should be. It's a life-threatening condition that can cause severe damage to a person's digestive system and lungs.

Though it's been challenging at times, Nicole has never allowed her condition to stop her from living her life, and she dedicated herself to caring for others as a nurse at Mayo Clinic in Rochester. In late 2012, Nicole’s life was interrupted for six months while she waited for a double lung transplant. That transplant finally came in early May 2013, but getting there wasn't easy.

For starters, in a story in a local newspaper, one of Nicole's pulmonary physicians at Mayo Clinic, Mark Wylam, M.D., said that to simply stay on the transplant list, Nicole couldn't leave the hospital during her six-month wait for a transplant. Not even to simply have lunch or a cup of coffee with family or friends. Read the rest of this entry »

View full entry · Comment on this

Tags: cystic fibrosis, Dr Mark Wylam, lung transplant, nursing, patient stories, transplant


April 18th, 2013

Atlanta to Jacksonville: Short travel for answers from Mayo Clinic

By Makala Arce MakalaArce

Diane McIverDiane McIver’s first visit to Mayo Clinic mixed health care with pleasure – she and her now husband tagged their annual physical appointments with a trip to the golf course. At the time, they were just dating and enjoyed “a fabulous mini vacation combining our health care with an activity we both love!” exclaimed McIver. 

Their first visit was around 10 years ago at Mayo Clinic in Scottsdale but since they live in Atlanta, Mayo Clinic’s Jacksonville campus has been their main location. It only takes a one-hour flight for them to get answers from Mayo Clinic.

McIver and her husband have visited other facilities in Atlanta but enjoy the convenience, location and friendly staff at Mayo Clinic. “The people who work at Mayo Clinic are absolutely the friendliest, nicest, and most professional team I have ever been associated with,” says McIver. 

With their Mayo Clinic care team, the McIvers are typically able to get all of their necessary exams done during the day and walk away with their test results at the end of the day. Through Mayo Clinic’s Executive Health Program, Diane is able to have her appointments fully coordinated with different specialists. Mayo Clinic has a unique model of care that facilitates efficient diagnosis, treatment and follow-up care all under one roof.

“Our schedules are extremely busy in regards to our career…taking a one-hour flight to visit Jacksonville is the best time we could spend in regards to our health," says Diane.  Our experience at Mayo Clinic takes health care to another level that all people should experience if possible.”

Related Departments

Read the rest of this entry »

View full entry · Comment on this

Tags: Diane McIver, Executive Health Program


Contact Us · Privacy Policy