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Oct 21, 2009 · Leave a Reply

Is that a lump? Now what?

By Yvette martin @yvette martin

When there is critical information that we don’t know, we run the risk of listening to hearsay, considering myths to be facts, not knowing the truth, and left to deal with the consequences. When it comes to breast cancer, Mayo Clinic wants you to know.

Please join Mayo Clinic and other Phoenix area community partners for the AZ Breast Cancer Summit, Saturday, Oct. 31, 2009, from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. at Arizona Grand Resort in Phoenix, Arizona.
Mayo Clinic has partnered with Sigma Pi Phi to present vital information to increase awareness of breast cancer in African Americans during its Pacific Regional Conference. This free, public event is open to all who are interested in learning more about early detection & genetics in breast cancer, meet professional caregivers and talk with survivors of this disease.

Members of the medical community are coming together with community partners to share knowledge and encourage attendees to take steps toward early detection. Although minority women are less likely than Caucasian women to be diagnosed with breast cancer, they tend to develop breast cancer earlier, have more aggressive tumors and too often are diagnosed in later stages. Although most breast changes are not cancerous, it's important to have them evaluated promptly.

Listen to Aretha Rodger's story of early detection and how she spends time educating others. (Source: Mayo Clinic Medical Edge, June 2009)

At the Mayo Clinic Breast Clinic in Arizona, Mayo physicians diagnose and treat more than 1,300 new patients with breast cancer each year. Through innovative treatment strategies and supportive team care, patients receive effective care with the comfort and trust that they're receiving the best care possible.

To learn more about the services and available treatment options at Mayo Clinic's Arizona campus, and to read patient stories, visit

This story was submitted by Yvette Martin, Recruitment Strategist, Human Resources, Mayo Clinic in AZ

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Tags: African-Americans, Breast Cancer, Breast Clinic, Minorities and Cancer

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