Sharing Mayo Clinic

Stories from patients, family, friends and Mayo Clinic staff

Cynthia (Cindy) Weiss (@cindyweiss)

Activity by Cynthia (Cindy) Weiss

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Cynthia (Cindy) Weiss (@cindyweiss) published a blog post Mon, Oct 14 2013 · View  

Eluding the ‘Widow Maker’: The Checkup that Saved His Life

George Roberts, vice president of a Florida-based road construction and contracting company

“You have to go to know.”

George Roberts will tell you he’s a busy man — too busy to worry about a physical.

As vice president of a Florida-based road construction and contracting company and chair of two industry groups, he’s got a lot to oversee. Taking time for a doctor’s visit wasn’t on his schedule.

However, Roberts refused to be absent when his wife, Stephanie, was scheduled for a preventive surgical procedure at Mayo Clinic earlier this summer. With her urging, he agreed to schedule a checkup at the same time. His wife’s insistence and that physical exam probably saved his life.

Roberts, then 46, was eligible to participate in Mayo Clinic’s Executive Health Program, best described as a comprehensive physical taking place over one to three days. The specialized program has served busy executives for more than 30 years and offers an efficient, cost-effective way to proactively manage health.

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Traci (@tracir) responded:

Thank you for sharing your story. My father had to have open heart surgery about 5 months ago for 2 bypasses. One of his bypasses was in the "widow maker" area as well.

Posted Oct 11, 2013 · View

pissed (@pissed) responded:

would rather eat what I flush down the toilet b/4 letting the staff in the cardio dept. touch me . To coin a phrase "give me liberty, or give me death". Mayo's staff does not recognize your legal rights, granted this is my opinion, but it happened to me it can happen to you!

Posted Oct 14, 2013 · View
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Cynthia (Cindy) Weiss (@cindyweiss) published a blog post Wed, Jul 31 2013 · View  

Anna’s Story: A Personal Approach to Cancer

Anna and her daughter, Taylor, vacationing last summer in Mount Eagle, TN.

Anna (left) and her daughter, Taylor, vacationing last summer in Mount Eagle, TN.

At age 30, Anna Webster was a busy single mom juggling work and caring for her 11-year-old daughter. She didn’t have time to be sick. But after passing out one evening in the spring of 2009, she spent three days in a Jacksonville, Fla., emergency room while doctors tried to figure out what was wrong. Her potassium level was extremely low and her kidneys were having issues. Then a CT scan found a mass on her liver.

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Cynthia (Cindy) Weiss (@cindyweiss) published a blog post Wed, Jul 31 2013 · View  

Adventures of a 31-year-old Pancreatic Cancer Survivor

Dorylee Baez (in purple) and a group of friends and supporters enjoy a zip lining adventure at Toro Verde in Orocovis, Puerto Rico.

Dorylee Baez (in purple) and a group of friends and supporters from the newly formed Asociación Puertorriqueña del Cáncer del Páncreas enjoy a zip lining adventure at Toro Verde in Orocovis, Puerto Rico.

Dorylee Baez lives fearlessly.

Whether flying down a zip line or organizing a pancreatic cancer patient group in Puerto Rico, she plunges into life with zest.

The 31-year-old academic advisor at Universidad del Este in Carolina, Puerto Rico, is known as someone who is tenacious, overcoming whatever obstacles get in her way to achieve and achieve her goals.

For instance, Baez attended college while simultaneously working and caring for her ailing mother who was suffering from lupus. After her mother died, Baez pressed on to honor her memory and completed a bachelor’s degree in education and a master’s degree in college-level education administration. But then, at 29, Baez learned she had a large tumor in her pancreas. Not the diagnosis she was expecting when she went to the doctor.

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Cynthia (Cindy) Weiss (@cindyweiss) published a blog post Mon, Jun 10 2013 · View  

Soccer Mom Strokes on the Field

Jessica Cook and her sons (from left) Jonah, Josh and Jacob.

The phrase “soccer mom” might be a cliché, but for Jessica Cook of Jacksonville, Fla., it was apropos. The mom of three boys (ages 6, 10 and 13) spent hours in the car each week driving her sons from one field to another for their weekly soccer practices and games.

With a family history of migraines, headaches were not uncommon for Cook, 33. So when she awoke on the morning of Sept. 24, 2011, she dismissed the growing ache to ensure the boys got to the soccer field on time. But as the hours went on, Cook’s pain worsened. She began to feel nauseous, too. Thinking the heat and humidity were contributing to her symptoms, Cook headed for her car, hoping air conditioning might help.

But then she fell down.

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Cynthia (Cindy) Weiss (@cindyweiss) published a blog post Tue, Jun 4 2013 · View  

To Test or Not to Test – Genetics, That Is

Maegan Roberts, a certified genetic counselor at Mayo Clinic, helps determine if someone should be tested for cancer-causing genes. She works closely with the Breast Clinic at Mayo Clinic.

Maegan Roberts, a certified genetic counselor at Mayo Clinic, helps determine if someone should be tested for cancer-causing genes. She works closely with the Breast Clinic at Mayo Clinic.

So I wonder if anyone else spent part of Tuesday, May 14, 2013, pondering what they would do.

Would they take the test to learn if they were at increased risk of breast and ovarian cancer? What if it came back positive? What decision would they make – to keep their breasts and uterus or remove them?

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Cynthia (Cindy) Weiss (@cindyweiss) published a blog post Fri, May 24 2013 · View  

He Said, She Said: How One Couple Battled Colon Cancer Together

Sue Willingham remembers the May 2010 day well. She was getting ready to take her two children to school. But before leaving the house, she did what any mom might – use the restroom.

But then she noticed she’d lightly soiled her undergarments. Only she didn’t remember it happening.

Mayo Clinic patients Sue and Darrin Willingham

Mayo Clinic patients Sue and Darrin Willingham

At 45, Willingham was the picture of health. She ate well, exercised and stayed up on doctor visits. But in that moment, something changed. She called her husband. “I remember telling him I’m scared,” she says.

But then Willingham, who describes herself as someone who is not easily rattled, tried to rationalize the accident, chalking it up to the six fiber pills she’d taken the day before to combat constipation.

“Being one that does not jump to conclusions or get upset or scared of anything easily, I said this is ridiculous, crazy, there is nothing wrong with me. I have no cancer in my family. I have no anything…” But today she admits, “Maybe subconsciously I had been aware of what he had gone through the year before.”

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Cynthia (Cindy) Weiss (@cindyweiss) published a blog post Fri, May 24 2013 · View  

A new treatment for brain Aneurysms

Kristi Coody and familyAfter Clinic trial in Rochester, Kristi Coody continues her care in Florida

Kristi Coody had suffered migraine-like headaches for three months, but this time the pain was more intense. She lay down on the living room floor of her Orange City, Fla., home and let her girls play around her. Her husband found her there when he came home from work that evening.

“This headache was much different than before and lasted approximately 16 hours before it broke,” Coody recalls.

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