Sharing Mayo Clinic

Stories from patients, family, friends and Mayo Clinic staff

Cynthia (Cindy) Weiss

Cynthia (Cindy) Weiss (@cindyweiss)

Mayo Clinic Public Affairs; two-time cancer survivor, advocate and storyteller. 

Activity by Cynthia (Cindy) Weiss

Cynthia (Cindy) Weiss

Sun, Aug 16 at 4:55pm CDT by Cynthia (Cindy) Weiss · View  

Patients Tell How Pain Rehabilitation Program Brought Them Relief

Christy Jeck discusses her experience at Mayo's Pain Rehabilitation Center in Florida. Three weeks. It sounds like a long time, especially if you’re going to a hospital or clinic every day.

But for people living with chronic pain, a daily, multi-week program is compelling if it can help them return to a more active lifestyle.

Established in 2011, the Pain Rehabilitation Center at Mayo Clinic's Florida campus offers a robust and integrated three-week outpatient program for adults affected by chronic pain and symptoms. [...]

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DLynn

DLynn (@dlynn) responded Sun, Aug 16 at 8:21pm CDT · View

What is the information for Glucocil? Does it help? It is suppose to control Pre diabetes and diabetes.

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Cynthia (Cindy) Weiss

Mon, Jul 20 at 12:00pm CDT by Cynthia (Cindy) Weiss · View  

Patient Comes to Mayo for Foot Surgery, Receives Lifesaving Surprise

Virgil Jernigan is enjoying his retirement thanks to  surgery to repair a leaky mitral valve.When Virgil Jernigan came to Mayo Clinic for foot surgery, he was in for a lifesaving surprise. During an exam before his surgery, he mentioned to his nurse practitioner that he had been feeling fatigued and short of breath. So she ordered cardiac testing. Virgil was shocked to learn he had a leaking mitral valve – a potentially life-threatening heart condition.  [...]

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natty

natty (@natty) responded Wed, Jul 29 at 2:28pm CDT · View

I'm sorry not really sure if I'm on the right spot to message.. Please help me

Hoyt Finnamore

Hoyt Finnamore (@hoytfinnamore) responded Wed, Jul 29 at 2:53pm CDT · View

Hi, Natty. I'm sorry to hear that. Here's a link to information about Chiari malformation, including various treatment options: http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/chiari-malformation/basics/definition/con-20031115 If you would like to seek help from Mayo Clinic, please contact the Appointment office. You can find numbers for our various locations here: http://www.mayoclinic.org/appointments I hope this is helpful to you.

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Cynthia (Cindy) Weiss

Mon, May 11 at 1:44pm CDT by Cynthia (Cindy) Weiss · View  

Brain Hemorrhage Can’t Keep Cyclist From Pedaling On

Donnie continues to recover from a brain hemorrhage that caused a stroke.

At age 42, Donnie DeWitt was the picture of health. A former Marine, he loved to run, surf and was an avid cyclist. But three years ago, while on a bike ride near his home in St. Augustine, Florida, Donnie collapsed. He’d suffered a massive brain hemorrhage that led to a stroke.

He was brought to Mayo Clinic’s Comprehensive Stroke Center in Jacksonville, where physicians said the damage was so extensive that Donnie had less than a five percent chance of survival.

“We didn’t know if he was going to live, what the outcome would be,” says Belinda, Donnie’s wife. [...]

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Cynthia (Cindy) Weiss

Mon, May 4 at 5:00am CDT by Cynthia (Cindy) Weiss · View  

Young Stroke Survivor Raises Awareness and Educates

Young stroke survivor Amy Edmunds and Dr. David Miller, director of the Comprehensive Stroke Center at Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Florida

Young stroke survivor Amy Edmunds and David Miller, M.D., director of the Comprehensive Stroke Center at Mayo Clinic's Florida campus.

Editor's Note: This guest post is written by Amy Edmunds, founder of YoungStroke.

In 2002, I was a daily commuter to Capitol Hill who worked in sales management. Never did I think I would someday return to testify as a patient advocate at Congressional hearings on behalf of young stroke survivors. But then again, never did I expect to be a stroke survivor at age 45.

On Jan. 11, 2002, with no identified risk factors and no family history, I had an ischemic stroke. Initially, my mother observed my repeating phrases during conversation. Next, she witnessed my temporary blindness. Today, I have no recollection of these events. And my resulting deficit remains some long-term memory loss.

Like many, I mistakenly assumed stroke was an affliction of the elderly. As I attempted to learn more about my own experience, I learned approximately 30 percent of people who suffer a stroke each year are under age 65. And women are at an increased risk for stroke. So, too, are African American individuals – many of whom have significant aftereffects.  [...]

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Cynthia (Cindy) Weiss

Oct 2, 2014 by Cynthia (Cindy) Weiss · View  

Orchestrating Cancer Treatment Not An Obstacle For International Musician

Alvaro Gomez plays his violin. Alvaro Gomez knows people in several continents and has access to health care in the U.S., Chile and Europe. When the Central Florida resident faced a prostate cancer diagnosis, he polled his acquaintances and doctors near and far and came up with one answer: Mayo Clinic.

“I was fortunate that after taking into account the advice from friends and doctors, I came to the conclusion that the best place to go was Mayo Clinic, only an hour-and-a-half from my house,” Gomez says.

Gomez leads a busy life as a violinist, music instructor and orchestra conductor in Florida, Chile, Brazil and Italy. Now, just outside busy Orlando, Fla., he directs his own music academy, conducts the Florida Young Artists Orchestra, and teaches music at Trinity Prep in Winter Park. Internationally, he leads the annual Luis Sigall Music Competition in Viña del Mar, in his native Chile. He also conducts a chamber orchestra at Festival Villa-Lobos in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, and each summer conducts at L’Orfeo Music Festival in Vipiteno, Italy.

In part due to his busy schedule, Gomez took time for a routine health checkup. Although he felt fine at the time, a routine blood test at age 56 turned up high PSA (prostate-specific antigen) levels. His family doctor recommended a biopsy, which revealed cancer cells, and put him on a quest to find the best place to receive treatment.

[...]

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Cynthia (Cindy) Weiss

Jun 1, 2014 by Cynthia (Cindy) Weiss · View  

What makes a cancer survivor?

Cindy Weiss in a photo from 2005, during her initial treatment for ovarian cancer.

Cindy Weiss in a photo from 2005, during her initial treatment for ovarian cancer.

June 1 is designated National Cancer Survivor Day – a time to celebrate those living with cancer. It seems ironic, though, for one day to be called out as cancer survivor’s day. Let's be honest – once you receive a diagnosis of cancer, regardless of what kind, every day is essentially survivor’s day.

As a two-time ovarian cancer patient, I know this. But the word "survivor" brings some dilemma. Exactly who is a survivor? What defines a survivor? Are you a survivor after you've completed a six-month chemo regime? Finished weeks of radiation? Lived for x-number of years cancer-free? The question or definition of a survivor is something I and others have grappled with for years.

“Survivor” is a strong and powerful word. According to one definition, a survivor is one “who continues to function or prosper in spite of opposition, hardship, or setbacks.” Sounds like every cancer patient I've ever known. But it’s also a label I’d apply to family members and friends. It takes a village to raise a child, they say. So, too, I believe to fight cancer. By that definition, aren't we all survivors?

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Cynthia (Cindy) Weiss

May 16, 2014 by Cynthia (Cindy) Weiss · View  

#StrokeMonth: From Victim to Therapist

Stroke survivor Sean Bretz (center) with Lisa Lazaraton (far left), a physical therapist at Mayo Clinic in Florida, his mother and aunt (right).

Stroke survivor Sean Bretz with Lisa Lazaraton (left), a physical therapist at Mayo Clinic in Florida, his mother (center) and aunt.

It’s been almost three years since Sean Bretz collapsed. Unbeknownst to the then 23-year-old U.S. Coast Guardsman, a giant aneurysm had burst in his brain, causing a massive stroke.

“His prognosis was grim,” neurosurgeon Rabih Tawk, M.D., recalls. “We used every technology available to help him.”

Despite complications and issues, which required him to be induced into a medical coma, Bretz made an almost full recovery.

“I realize I was lucky and recovered pretty well. A lot of other people who have this type of stroke do not,” says Bretz, who attributes his success to the large team at Mayo Clinic’s Comprehensive Stroke Center.

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Cynthia (Cindy) Weiss

May 9, 2014 by Cynthia (Cindy) Weiss · View  

#StrokeMonth: It's a Numbers Game

Written by Lesia Mooney, Clinical Nurse Specialist, Mayo Clinic's Advanced Primary Stroke Center in Florida.

Members of the Mayo Clinic Primary Stroke Center in Florida host community events to help educate the public about stroke, stoke risk and ways to reduce risk.

Mooney (left) with other members of the Mayo Clinic Primary Stroke Center in Florida at a community event on stroke awareness.

795,000.
That's the number of people annually in the United States who have a stroke.

130,000.
That's the number of Americans who die each year due to stroke

$36.5 billion.
That’s the cost of stroke annually, which includes the cost of health care services, medications and missed days of work related to stroke.

The numbers are staggering, at least according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Stroke is a major health care issue, but yet I'm still surprised by the lack of awareness surrounding stroke.

There are many misconceptions about stroke, including that it’s an older person’s issue. In reality, stroke can happen to anyone, including children. I've seen patients as young as 18 and as old as 103.

[...]

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