Sharing Mayo Clinic

Stories from patients, family, friends and Mayo Clinic staff

Hoyt Finnamore (@hoytfinnamore)

Mayo Clinic Department of Public Affairs. Editor, Sharing Mayo Clinic and In the Loop. 

Activity by Hoyt Finnamore

Hoyt Finnamore (@hoytfinnamore) posted · Fri, Mar 27 10:52am · View  

An Unexpected Stop in Lake City Provides Comfort and a Smooth Transition Home

Bob Boehmer connects with his care team in Rochester via a telemedicine link. Gail and Bob Boehmer recall driving through Lake City, Minnesota, many times on their way to northern Wisconsin, where they first met. Neither of them ever imagined the town on Lake Pepin would become a home away from home.

The Waterloo, Iowa, couple recently spent six weeks in Lake City. It wasn’t something they’d planned. But then life happened. And after three helicopter rides and multiple surgeries at Mayo Clinic, Bob found himself in need of just the kind of healing environment Mayo Clinic Health System in Lake City offers through the Mayo Transitional Care program. The program provides patients recovering from major illness or surgery with transitional nursing care and therapy until they’re ready to go back home.

Although uncertain at first, the Boehmers say Lake City’s connection with Mayo Clinic not only helped Bob heal but also eased their minds and lifted their spirits.  [...]

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Hoyt Finnamore (@hoytfinnamore) posted · Mon, Mar 23 11:59am · View  

From 'Shock' to Hope – Young Woman Shares Her Breast Cancer Journey

Dawn DeCook-Gibson shares her story of breast cancer treatment at Mayo Clinic.. In her early 30s and with “a wonderful child, wonderful husband and a great career,” Dawn DeCook-Gibson says the last thing she expected was a breast cancer diagnosis. Following the initial shock of the news, Dawn, from Chandler, Arizona, sought out doctors at Mayo Clinic and was guided through her treatment and recovery by Donald Northfelt, M.D., her oncologist, and Barbara Pockaj, M.D., her surgeon.

“I was diagnosed with stage 2b lobular carcinoma breast cancer last year,” she says. “I was in shock … everything just seemed like it was perfect, and then the diagnosis came in. Honestly, it stopped me in my tracks.”

One of her family members had received care at Mayo’s Arizona campus and recommended that Dawn do the same. “She was adamant that I go to Mayo Clinic,” Dawn says.  [...]

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Hoyt Finnamore (@hoytfinnamore) posted · Fri, Mar 20 2:15pm · View  

Battling Colon Cancer at an Unexpected Age

Kelly Barnard, diagnosed with colon cancer at age 19, poses for a strong arm selfieThe majority of people diagnosed with colon cancer are older than 50. Kelly Barnard was just 19 years old when she got an unwelcome Valentine’s Day surprise. Her stomach pain turned out to be something much more serious.

Among cancer's many negative qualities is the seemingly indiscriminate way the disease manifests itself. Cancer doesn’t care what your race, gender or ethnicity is. It doesn't care about your profession where you live or your family situation. And it doesn't necessarily care about your age. Just ask Kelly Barnard.

Kelly's cancer story began when she was just 19 years old. Then a freshman at the College of St. Scholastica in Duluth, Minnesota, she began feeling intense stomach pain one day in her dorm room. And while she tells the Duluth Tribune she'd "felt some little twinges of pain" in her stomach before, those were nothing like the pain she felt just before Valentine's Day 2013. "It was horrendous," she tells the newspaper. "I couldn't walk. I couldn't move."  [...]

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Hoyt Finnamore (@hoytfinnamore) posted · Thu, Mar 26 6:21am · View  

Stopping the Seizures

Xander Torres shows off the scar from his brain surgery. After brain surgery at Mayo Clinic, Xander Torres is a healthy, happy kid

"My hand is wiggly." When 4-year-old Xander Torres said these words to his mother, Sarah, she had no idea the long journey they would begin. "To be honest, I didn't think much about it at first," she says.

Several weeks went by when Xander's hand was occasionally "wiggly." Then during a stint as ring-bearer in a family wedding, he had what looked to his parents like a seizure. Frightened and confused, they took Xander to several physicians in their hometown of Omaha, Nebraska. Unable to learn what was causing the problem, and with his seizures growing more frequent and severe, the Torres family decided to travel to Mayo Clinic’s campus in Rochester, Minnesota, in hope of finding answers.

After evaluation and several months of other therapies, young Xander eventually underwent brain surgery to relieve his seizures. The results have been life-changing. Today, with his seizures well-controlled, Xander is a little-league baseball player who loves science and intends to be a brain surgeon when he grows up.  [...]

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Kerrie-Sue Stahl (@kerriesuestahl) responded:

This story is so near and dear to me. On Nov. 10, 2015 it will my 40th anniversary of having brain surgery at the Mayo Clinic to relieve my epilepsy. It was 1975 and I was 9 years old and the first child to ever have this type of surgery. No pediatric neurosurgeon had done this type of surgery yet so I had a regular neurosurgeon, Dr. Edward Laws, who had never performed this surgery [...]

Posted Sat, Mar 21 at 11:21am CDT · View Hoyt Finnamore and saraht816 like this

Joyce Babcock (@joycebabcock) responded:

I dont have cancer to my knowledge .ive lost close 80 lbs since 2006 mostly on weight watchers.i have pcos irratable bowel syndrom w somstimes sevre constipation,id like to have a almost total hysterectomy because i believe i have endometrosis along w the pcos &i have a tilţed womb &fat from the weight lose on lower belly i like removed cause it makes it hard to keep clean. the pcos put me into menopause .i [...]

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Hoyt Finnamore (@hoytfinnamore) posted · Tue, Mar 10 1:36pm · View  

This Selfie Brought to You by Colon Cancer Screening

Jane Jacobs, colon cancer survivor, poses for a strong arm selfie.Twelve years after her diagnosis, Jane Jacobs knows the value of finding and treating colon cancer early and is participating in Fight Colorectal Cancer's #StrongArmSelfie campaign.

Jane Jacobs understands the squeamishness some people have as they consider going through tests to check for colon cancer. "No one wants to think about or talk about their colon," she says. "You don't see it. Its job is hardly glamorous. It tends to be part of the body people would rather forget about."

But after being diagnosed and successfully treated for early-stage colon cancer at age 40, Jane, who works in Media Support Services at Mayo Clinic, strongly encourages others to get past their hesitancy and get a colonoscopy.

"The bottom line is that the colon cancer screening process is not as bad as people make it out to be," she says. "It's a fairly straightforward test that can make the difference between an early diagnosis, when the disease can often be more easily treated, and a severe, sometimes life-threatening, illness."  [...]

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Hoyt Finnamore (@hoytfinnamore) posted · Fri, Feb 27 3:44pm · View  

Perfume Maker Gets Her Sense of Smell Back  

Kim Spadaro at work in her perfume studio. Kim Spadaro tells stories through scent. She travels the world capturing unique olfactory experiences and bottling them for others to share. "My experience [in these places] is really what turns it into a fragrance," she says. "I can tell you how something smells in a story."

That, of course, requires a keen sense of smell.

Kim used her talent and refined sense of smell to found Spadaro Luxury Fragrances and make a living capturing scents from around the world. Medical issues nearly derailed that and put an end to her perfuming days.  [...]

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Hoyt Finnamore (@hoytfinnamore) posted · Thu, Feb 26 6:28pm · View  

Gratitude, and the Voice of Experience

Mark-Pearce-WebMark Pearce jokes that, "If something's going to happen, it's going to happen to me." That sentiment isn't hard to understand in someone who has had eight joint replacements (knees, hips and shoulders – some more than once), has been cardioverted 18 times to restore normal heart rhythm, and had surgery for a brain tumor. Among other things. What may be harder to understand is how he's kept an amazingly positive attitude through it all.

For Mark, it starts with gratitude.

"I feel like being treated like royalty here," he says of his experience at Mayo Clinic. "It's amazing. And if there's any way that I could say thank you to the physicians here and to the complete staff … I wouldn't be alive today if it wasn't for you."

Mark came to Mayo Clinic in the 1980s for a procedure physicians in his home state of Michigan were hesitant to perform because of his prior neck fractures. At Mayo Clinic, he found physicians who were able to perform the procedure and manage things when his care got complicated. Since then, he's had his left knee replaced twice, and the right, once; three hip replacements; and two shoulder replacements. Brain surgery. Cardioversion and heart procedures. And a gastric bypass procedure to combat the weight gain cause by his pituitary tumor. [...]

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Mark Pearce (@dinki455) responded:

thank you for letting me tell my story its been a real pleasure to be a part of the Mayo family

Posted Thu, Feb 26 at 6:28pm CDT · View Hoyt Finnamore likes this
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Hoyt Finnamore (@hoytfinnamore) posted · Fri, Mar 13 11:41pm · View  

Breaking Away From Pain With the Help of 'The Scrambler'

KarenSafranek1000Participating in a clinical trial gave Karen Safranek a solution to her decade-long struggle with peripheral neuropathy 

Karen Safranek didn't take a worry-free step for 10 years. Severe peripheral neuropathy — a side effect of breast cancer treatment she received in 2002 — left her with constant burning, tingling, numbness and pain in both her feet.

Over time, Karen tried dozens of treatments to rid herself of the discomfort. Nothing worked. So in 2012 when she found out about a clinical research trial available at Mayo Clinic for people who had peripheral neuropathy after chemotherapy, she was interested, but not optimistic.

"I tried so many things. Anything a doctor recommended or heard about, or anything I heard about, I'd give it a try if I could," Karen says. "But years past, and the pain didn't get any better. By 2011, life was not good. I was analyzing my house to figure out where we could put a wheelchair ramp. At that time, I thought it wouldn't be much longer before I couldn't walk anymore."  [...]

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