Sharing Mayo Clinic

Stories from patients, family, friends and Mayo Clinic staff

Hoyt Finnamore (@hoytfinnamore)

Mayo Clinic Department of Public Affairs. Editor, Sharing Mayo Clinic and In the Loop. 

Activity by Hoyt Finnamore

Hoyt Finnamore (@hoytfinnamore) posted · Wed, Jul 16 5:06pm · View  

Air Ambulance Ride Confirms Family’s Gratitude for Mayo Clinic

Brandon and Becky Mauck, with their children. Growing up in South Dakota, Brandon Mauck had heard stories about the famous medical institution surrounded by cornfields in Rochester, Minnesota. Mayo Clinic's reputation inspired him to become part of the Mayo organization, and for the past four years, he has been working in the Department of Nursing at Mayo Clinic in Arizona. What he perhaps wasn't expecting is how strongly his beliefs about the organization would be confirmed through his personal experience and that of his young family.

Recently, Brandon wrote to Mayo Clinic's president and CEO, John Noseworthy, M.D., to recount a personal story that confirmed his pride in Mayo. “I must say that I never imagined that I would be so well cared for by my employer," he writes. "I feel it is vitally important to say ‘thank you’ and make sure you all know how grateful I am.”

It all started in late 2013, at a family gathering in North Dakota in 2013. Brandon had traveled there with his wife, Becky, and two daughters, Annastyn, then 3, and Maci, then 2. Just a few hours after their arrival for the festivities, Becky, who was 29 weeks pregnant, went into premature labor.

“Being in rural North Dakota and three hours away from trusted medical care was quite distressing,” Brandon says. [...]

Click here to view the rest of the post

Login here to comment.

Hoyt Finnamore (@hoytfinnamore) posted · Mon, Jul 7 4:19pm · View  

Nicole’s Journey From Nurse to Transplant Patient and Back

Mayo Clinic nurse and transplant patient Nicole Jahns. When Nicole Jahns was just five months old, her parents – and her doctors – knew something was wrong. She wasn't gaining weight like a five-month-old should, and she wasn't, as her doctors put it, "thriving." They soon discovered why. Nicole had cystic fibrosis, an inherited disorder that affects the cells that produce mucus, sweat and digestive juices causing them to become thick and sticky rather than thin and slippery, as they should be. It's a life-threatening condition that can cause severe damage to a person's digestive system and lungs.

Though it's been challenging at times, Nicole has never allowed her condition to stop her from living her life, and she dedicated herself to caring for others as a nurse at Mayo Clinic in Rochester. In late 2012, Nicole’s life was interrupted for six months while she waited for a double lung transplant. That transplant finally came in early May 2013, but getting there wasn't easy.

For starters, in a story in a local newspaper, one of Nicole's pulmonary physicians at Mayo Clinic, Mark Wylam, M.D., said that to simply stay on the transplant list, Nicole couldn't leave the hospital during her six-month wait for a transplant. Not even to simply have lunch or a cup of coffee with family or friends. [...]

Click here to view the rest of the post

Lady Di (@ladydi_49) responded:

So happy for you Nicole. Your story caught my eye because I have a 32 year old son with CF. I was originally surfing the Mayo Clinic website to find out about minimally invasive heart valve repair/replacement stories and did happen upon one. I have 2+ tricuspid regurgitation, and trace mitral and pulmonic valve regurgitation. I have been a nurse for 25 years so I know things can worsen over time. I'm pretty sure this [...]

Posted Mon, Jul 7 at 4:19pm CDT · View
Login here to comment.

Hoyt Finnamore (@hoytfinnamore) posted · Tue, Jun 24 9:09am · View  

Second Opinion Leads to a Second Chance at Sight

Mayo Clinic patient Audrey Dean.Audrey Dean has been a lifelong advocate for social justice. After a notable career in social work, she earned a law degree and became senior counsel for the Alberta Human Rights Commission in 1992. At age 75, she is still arguing cases — some before the Supreme Court of Canada. “It’s fortunate that the government of Alberta doesn’t have mandatory retirement,” she says wryly.

The Alberta government had no intention of ending Audrey's career. But in 2009, it looked as if failing eyesight might. The crusading lawyer, who had always had perfect vision, began having trouble reading and driving.

She consulted with a local ophthalmologist, who diagnosed cataracts and recommended surgery to remove them. But unconvinced of the diagnosis, Audrey sought a second opinion at Mayo Clinic in Arizona.

This wasn’t her first experience with Mayo Clinic. Years earlier, her husband had consulted physicians there after learning he had cancer. And she had been seen doctors at Mayo about her own hearing loss — the result of radiation therapy for non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. When she began having eye problems, she felt Mayo Clinic was the obvious choice.  [...]

Click here to view the rest of the post

Login here to comment.

Hoyt Finnamore (@hoytfinnamore) posted · Wed, Jun 11 4:00pm · View  

Near-death experience brings second chance, new calling

Nancy Capelle with emergency medical technician Mike Szumagala, whose quick actions helped save her life.

Nancy Capelle with emergency medical technician Mike Szumagala, whose quick actions helped save her life.

On May 14, 2011, Nancy Capelle, a wife and mother of two young daughters, clinically died at the age of 40. She suffered spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD), a condition that blocks blood flow to the heart causing a heart attack, abnormalities in heart rhythm and sudden death. But thanks to the quick actions of a paramedic, she is alive today to tell her harrowing story of life and death.

What was so hard for Nancy to comprehend following her medical emergency, she says, was that in a blink of an eye and without warning, healthy young women can be stricken by SCAD and die. Yet it didn’t appear from her research into the condition that the medical community was actively researching the tragic phenomenon. Perhaps it was because it was considered so rare that support for such a study would be difficult to find, she thought, or that finding enough SCAD survivors would be even more problematic.

Then Nancy came across an article in the Aug. 30, 2011, edition of The Wall Street Journal titled, “When Patients Band Together -- Using Social Networks To Spur Research for Rare Diseases; Mayo Clinic Signs On.” For Nancy, this article changed the dark face of SCAD dramatically, and she would find herself and many other young women just like her able to see daylight again. [...]

Click here to view the rest of the post

Login here to comment.

Hoyt Finnamore (@hoytfinnamore) posted · Fri, May 30 4:59pm · View  

Untangling a complex medical challenge

Amy Supergan with family members in Sienna, Italy.Amy Supergan has battled a host of difficult and painful disorders. Now she's found a way back to enjoying her life and her family.

In the summer of 2013, Amy Supergan took a trip to Italy. That may not sound extraordinary, but there was a time when being able to travel and enjoy a vacation with her family seemed like an impossible goal.

Amy faces a range of challenging medical problems, but at the top of that list is pain so debilitating she was forced to quit her career and give up an active lifestyle. But through the care she has received at Mayo Clinic and her participation in an innovative clinical research trial, Amy has found a renewed ability to manage her pain, and enjoy friends and family when she is able.

"Although I may never ski again or be back at work, with the help of all of my doctors at Mayo, I am now able to live independently with some assistance," she says. "I have found happiness in being more relaxed and appreciating some of the smaller things in life. I don’t feel like I’m missing out on life as I did before." [...]

Click here to view the rest of the post

Login here to comment.

Hoyt Finnamore (@hoytfinnamore) replied to A heart transplant put him back in the race · Tue, May 27 8:35am · View  

Hi, Taunia. That sounds like a discussion you'd want to have with your doctors. You can also connect with other transplant patients on Mayo Clinic Connect: http://connect.mayoclinic.org/group/transplants

Login here to comment.

Hoyt Finnamore (@hoytfinnamore) replied to My name is Brandon Wetzel and I am 21 years old. I [...] · Fri, May 16 4:00pm · View  

Brandon, I'm sorry to hear about your difficulties. I hope you find the relief you're looking for at Mayo. For more information on appointments, visit http://www.mayoclinic.org/appointments.

Login here to comment.

Hoyt Finnamore (@hoytfinnamore) posted · Fri, May 16 1:41pm · View  

Joyous Victory: Lung Cancer Survivor Finds Her Niche, Gives Back to Help Others

Written by Eunice Nishimura

Eunice Nishimura at Mayo Clinic in Arizona.My journey started innocently enough as a neck strain I received while playing with my daughter’s golden retriever in October 2010. As the year ended, the discomfort had increased, and I sought out my physician in January 2011. He set up appointments for MRI and MRA exams. Once done, I quickly ended up at a level I Trauma Center, where I was diagnosed with a tumor on my C3 spine. The full diagnosis was stage IV non-small cell lung cancer with spine and lymph node metastases. The lung tumor was inoperable due to its proximity to the pulmonary aorta. Within 48 hours, the lymph node was removed, and I began radiation on the spine tumor, which lasted 3 weeks.

During that period, a cousin in Southern California suggested I contact Mayo Clinic in Arizona for a second opinion and gave me the name of Dr. Helen Ross.  I had my consultation with Dr. Ross on Feb. 7.

From our first meeting with Dr. Ross, both my husband and I developed a trust and respect for her that continues to this day. Dr. Ross presents a forthright, open and considered respect for me not only as a patient but also an individual. She does not sugarcoat her evaluations. She always questions what has been done in the past and then takes it one step further.  [...]

Click here to view the rest of the post

Login here to comment.

Load More    

Loading information...